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Tuesday, July 26, 2016

WRITERS ON BOOKS ~ PETER BRANDVOLD

WRITERS ON BOOKS ~ PETER BRANDVOLD
 
As part of an ongoing series of blog posts, I’ve asked western pulp master Peter Brandvold to give us a personal look into what writers read and what books influence their lives. 

Currently the acknowledged king of the fast-moving, hard-driving western novel, Peter has written over a hundred westerns under his own name and his pen name, Frank Leslie. He has also written thirty Longarm novels under the name Tabor Evans. He’s written several novels under the banner of the late Ralph Compton. Under his own name he writes the popular .45-Caliber books (featuring Cuno Massey), the bounty hunter Lou Prophet series, the Yakima Henry tales, the Rogue Lawman series, and others. Through his own Mean Pete publishing imprint, Peter has also become a dynamic force in the world of self-publishing…
 
Thx for stepping out of the saddle, Peter, and hunkering down with us around the campfire…
 
THE BOOK YOU LOVED AS A CHILD…
 
Oddly enough, it was a bulky, water-damaged, falling-apart fifth grade reading text. The stories I remember liking most and which made me want to try to practice such dark alchemy myself were: Beware of the Dog by Roald Dahl, All Summer in A Day, by Ray Bradbury, Odyssey of the North by Jack London, The Ears of Johnny Bear by John Steinbeck, In Another Country by Hemingway, and Wine on the Desert by Max Brand. I loved that book. I read every word—even those that weren’t assigned. I still remember how that book smelled, the splotches of dried dirty snowmelt and green snot previous students had mashed between the pages, and the Fuck scribbled in spidery pencil on the inside of the back cover. 
 
A BOOK YOU WOULD READ TO YOUR KIDS…
 
Since I don’t have kids, I really don’t know what’s out there for kids these days. At least not for kids young enough to be read to. One of the first books that was read to me was Where The Red Fern Grows, so I’d probably read that one but I’m probably way, way out of date! But I know how important it is to read to kids. My fifth grade teacher even read Ann Of Green Gables to us, and I, a boy’s boy, loved hearing it though I suppose it’s considered more of a girl’s book. But the images remain. It’s important to read any kind of a story to kids. A teacher also read A Wrinkle In Time and Old Yeller to us, as well as The Witch Of Blackbird Pond. I remember them all.
 
THE BOOK THAT MADE YOU WANT TO BE A WRITER…
 
That fifth grade text but also Huckleberry Finn and Mandingo. I read my father’s old paperback Mandingo he acquired when he was in the army and being transported around the South Pacific. Most of the first books I read came from his somewhat proscribed library which included Tobacco Road and Peyton Place. I loved Mandingo and even though it’s probably not politically correct to say this, I still do. As well as its sequel, Drum. Great vivid writing. Such writing just doesn’t show up anymore. Most of the books published these days would not have been published twenty or thirty years ago. The editors would have told those writers to keep punching away and maybe try a correspondence course.
 
YOUR FAVORITE CLASSIC…
 
It’s a tossup between Moby Dick and War And Peace. I reread big chunks of both regularly. Also The Sea Wolf.
 
THE CLASSIC YOU’VE NEVER BEEN ABLE TO READ…
 
Finnegan’s Wake
 
THE CLASSIC YOU’VE PRETENDED TO HAVE READ…
 
I don’t know...maybe The Bible when I was in Lutheran confirmation class. I think I’ve read most of the whole thing since, though.
 
THE MOVIE ADAPTATION YOU’VE LOVED…
 
Jaws. (I can recite great chunks after a few home-brews...)
 
THE BOOK YOU’D LIKE TO SEE AS A MOVIE…
 
My Uncle Oswald by Roald Dahl, but only if they do it right. It would probably have to be rated X, however. I wish they would do a straight adaptation of either Robert E. Howard or Karl Edward Wagner. I don’t understand why Hollywood keeps trying to rewrite these great writers. Howard is legendary for the stories he wrote, so why doesn’t Hollywood make what he wrote? Why do they think their pastiches are better? Against the evidence!
 
THE IMAGINARY PLACE WHERE YOU COULD LIVE…
 
The world I create in my own books, especially the Stillman books. I like that one though it can be violent at times. 
 
THE GENRE YOU’D READ IF YOU WERE LIMITED TO ONE…
 
I would say westerns if there were better westerns written, but, outside of my own, he-he, and damn few others, there just aren’t. So I’d probably read sword and sorcery just for Karl Edward Wagner if no one else but I probably say that now because I happen to be reading Wagner again. If I were reading Chandler, I’d probably say detective noir. 
 
THE BOOK YOU’VE RETURNED TO AGAIN AND AGAIN…

Probably the book I reread the most often is Hemingway’s collected stories but I have to also mention Smith & Other Events by Paul St. Pierre, little-known (to Americans) Canadian writer, now dead.
 
THE FICTIONAL FRIENDS YOU’D LOVE TO HAVE…
 
Conan. Man, could that guy back you in a bar fight!
 
THE LAST NOVEL TO MAKE YOU LAUGH AND THE LAST TO MAKE YOU CRY…
 
Roughing It by Twain and The Determined Heart by Antoinette May (about Mary Shelley).
 
WHAT YOU’RE READING NOW…
 
Night In The Lonesome October by Richard Laymon.
 
Peter’s newest series features U.S. Marshal Bear Haskell, former union war hero, former Pinkerton agent, current deputy United States marshal. Bear is a big man—over six and a half feet tall and as broad as a barn door. He wears a necklace of bear claws taken from the grizzly who almost had him for supper. That’s the kind of man Bear is. He holds a grudge and he gives no quarter—to grizzly bears or men.
 
FOR MORE ON PETER’S BOOKS CLICK HERE
 
TO VISIT PETER’S WEBSITE CLICK HERE



Sunday, July 24, 2016

WRITERS ON BOOKS ~ TERRENCE MCCAULEY

 
WRITERS ON BOOKS ~ TERRENCE MCCAULEY

I’ve asked my Fight Card compatriot Terrence McCauley (Fight Card: Against The Ropes—a prequel to his hard hitting novel Prohibition) to contribute to a new blog post sequence examining what books writers are reading and what books have influenced their lives. 

An award-winning writer of crime fiction and thrillers, Terrence’s most recent techno-thriller, A Murder Of Crows—sequel to Sympathy For The Devil—has just been released by Polis Books and is garnering rave reviews. More importantly (to me anyway), Terrence is a huge soccer fan who unfortunately supports Liverpool FC in the English Premier League and NYCFC in Major League Soccer instead of FC Barcelona in La Liga and Major League Soccer’s LA Galaxy. Somehow, we still manage to be friends…A proud native of The Bronx, NY, he is currently writing his next work of fiction.

Thanks for taking time, Terrence to consider these questions about the books in your life…

THE BOOK I LOVED AS A CHILD…

I can’t really think of one. My parents didn’t read to me and, since I was an only child, I got my entertainment mostly from television. I read a lot of the required texts all school kids have to read, but none of them stuck with me, not even A Christmas Carol or A Wrinkle In Time or even the Hardy Boys books. 

I really wasn’t really touched by impact literature could have until I was in high school. The first work to have an impact on me was a poem I read in sophomore year called Death of the Ball Turret Gunner by Randall Jarrell, followed by The Merchant of Venice and The Shining. The only common element of all three works is that they ultimately had a profound impact on me as a student and sparked my interest in wanting to become a writer. 

A BOOK YOU WOULD READ TO YOUR KIDS…

Probably my Fight Card entry Against the Ropes. It would give them a sense of the importance of loyalty, of injustice and of staying true to one’s own self despite the consequences. 

THE BOOK THAT MADE YOU WANT TO BE A WRITER…

Tai Pan by James Clavell. It doesn’t hold the same power over me now as it did back when I first read it in high school, but I’ll never forget reading it for the first time and being mesmerized by the story. Clavell layers details throughout the story that become important later on as the plot moves along. My admiration for his ability to craft a story in such a way made me pay more attention to the writing in a novel than just the words on the page.

YOUR FAVORITE CLASSIC…

My definition of a classic may be very different than someone else’s definition. To me, The Harder They Fall is one of the best books of its generation. It’s a tale of false perceptions becoming reality, dreams shattered and lives ruined all in pursuit of the almighty dollar. It’s the only book I’ve ever read that made me miss my subway stop because I was that close to the end that I didn’t realize where I was. Brutal, unflinching and real.

THE CLASSIC YOU’VE NEVER BEEN ABLE TO READ…

Moby-Dick (The Whale). I’ve never been able to get into it and I’ve tried several times. Most of Hemmingway’s stuff, too. I know he’s supposed to be good, but I think he’s grossly over-rated. I know I’m in the minority on that score, but it’s my opinion. He writes like a journalist, which makes sense since that’s what he was, but there’s no depth of feeling in his work. I’ve been told the depth is there, but I haven’t found it. The words just lay on the page like a dead possum on the side of the road. 

THE CLASSIC YOU’VE PRETENDED TO HAVE READ…

I gave this one a lot of thought and I don’t think I’ve ever pretended to read something I didn’t actually read. I’ve never been afraid of admitting my own ignorance and doing something about it. 

THE MOVIE ADAPTATION YOU’VE LOVED…

I thought L.A. Confidential was a fantastic adaptation of a book that was nearly impossible to film. They took all the right parts and struck just the right tone. The casting was also top-notch.

THE BOOK YOU’D LIKE TO SEE AS A MOVIE…

I think Eric Beetner’s Rumrunners would make an interesting movie, as would Lamentations by Joe Clifford.

THE IMAGINARY PLACE WHERE YOU COULD LIVE…

I’d probably choose the fictional town where Lew Archer works in Ross Macdonald’s excellent series of novels. 

THE GENRE YOU’D READ IF YOU WERE LIMITED TO ONE…

Noir fiction suits my world view best. It’s more than just a haunted man with a bottle of bourbon in his desk and a pretty secretary in his lap. When it’s done well, it’s a rich and deeply rewarding genre that can be approached in a variety of ways. To cross art forms for a moment, I thoroughly believe the excellent sci-fi film Ex Machina is just Double Indemnity with robots. The cast and setting can change, but the deception and heartache at the core of noir never does. 

THE BOOK YOU’VE RETURNED TO AGAIN AND AGAIN…

The Cold Six Thousand by James Ellroy. The way he creates a scene and carries tension through a book is fantastic. L.A. Confidential is another one I’ve probably read three times and love it each time.

THE FICTIONAL FRIENDS YOU’D LOVE TO HAVE…

Jesse Stone, Hitch and Cole (all three from Robert B. Parker stories) and Samson from Len Deighton’s spy novels. With all four of those protagonists around me, I’d have a good, grounded group of people to keep me level.

THE LAST NOVEL TO MAKE YOU LAUGH AND THE LAST TO MAKE YOU CRY…

They’re both the same novel: Berlin Game by Len Deighton. It’s a novel—and series—that deserves a hell of a lot more attention than it receive. They’re complex, funny and full of emotion. I find myself quietly riveted to the story without realizing how much I’ve read so quickly. I recommend that novel to anyone who is looking to learn how to write or looking for a good way to break into the spy genre. 

WHAT YOU’RE READING NOW…

I just finished George R. R. Martin’s Fevre Dream based on the recommendation of a good friend on line.  God, what a long, hard slog that was. That was an example of a book that could’ve easily been a hundred pages shorter and even more rewarding. But, I admire Martin’s style, so I’ve decided to bite the bullet and give Game of Thrones a shot. I’m not a fantasy guy, but I’ve seen the series and want to see what all the fuss is about. Like I said, I’ve never been afraid of admitting my own ignorance. 

Thx, Terrence…Great getting your thoughts on writers and books…

Saturday, July 23, 2016

WRITERS ON BOOKS ~ ERIC BEETNER

WRITERS ON BOOKS ~ ERIC BEETNER
 
As part of an ongoing series of blog posts, I’ve asked rising star Eric Beetner to give us a personal look into what writers read and what books influence their lives.
 
If you want pistol-whipping, boot-stomping, nasty noir, then Eric Beetner is the guy for you—or his books anyway…Eric himself is wonderful blend of kind and cool…He’s the quick-fisted presence behind two of the best Fight Card novels (Split Decision / A Mouthful Of Blood) with his work since exploding across the hardboiled mystery scene. Rumrunners, The Devil Doesn’t Want Me, and Stripper Pole At The End Of The World, are just a few of the tough, noir influenced works Eric has published to critical acclaim… 
 
THE BOOK YOU LOVED AS A CHILD…
 
One I really remember is called The Great Cheese Conspiracy. It’s about a gang of mice who live in an old movie house watching old gangster films and get inspired to rob the cheese shop next door. I think it inspired my love of crime fiction at a young age.
 
A BOOK YOU WOULD READ TO YOUR KIDS…
 
Another favorite from childhood I had the pleasure to read to my girls is The Phantom Tollbooth. My girls are reading on their own now so this is close to the last book they let me read to them, but it is such an important book to me. I had to share it with them.
 
THE BOOK THAT MADE YOU WANT TO BE A WRITER…
 
I think the one that turned the tide and made me want to commit to crime fiction was A Simple Plan by Scott Smith. Before that I was more omnivorous as a reader, but that solidified the types of stories I like best.
 
YOUR FAVORITE CLASSIC…
 
Oh, man, making me choose! I do my best to read the classics of crime. I know I have a long way to go, but my favorite for now might be The Hot Spot by Charles Williams. It was originally titled Hell Hath No Fury when it came but the movie title is how it is republished today. But ask me again in 5 minutes and I’ll switch to something else like The Kiss Off or The Big Steal or Rendezvous In Black or Double Indemnity or…or…or…
 
THE CLASSIC YOU’VE NEVER BEEN ABLE TO READ…
 
Maybe Crime and Punishment? But to be honest I haven’t tried that hard. I know better than to try some classic detective fiction like Agatha Christie because I know it’s just not my thing.
 
THE CLASSIC YOU’VE PRETENDED TO HAVE READ…
 
I never pretend. I’ll cop to not reading something every time. Talented Mr. Ripley is one I’ve never read but probably should. I own it. Just never read it.
 
THE MOVIE ADAPTATION YOU’VE LOVED…
 
Back to A Simple Plan. They really nailed it
 
THE BOOK YOU’D LIKE TO SEE AS A MOVIE…
 
Well, any of mine, of course. I’d like to see Gun Monkeys by Victor Gischler. With the right cast, it could be a lot of fun.
 
THE IMAGINARY PLACE WHERE YOU COULD LIVE…
 
It’s far away enough to be imaginary and mythical in my mind, but I’d love to have lived and worked in Hollywood in the 1940s. A great time for film.
 
THE GENRE YOU’D READ IF YOU WERE LIMITED TO ONE…
 
Hardboiled crime fiction
 
THE BOOK YOU’VE RETURNED TO AGAIN AND AGAIN…
 
I don’t re-read very much, but when I even think of it I always want to start with Wild At Heart by Barry Gifford.
 
THE FICTIONAL FRIENDS YOU’D LOVE TO HAVE…
 
Oh man, I’ll say the Amlingmeyer brothers from Steve Hockensmith’s Holmes on the Range series. Or Hap and Leonard from Joe Lansdale’s series. Both pairs get into a lot of trouble though so you’d have to watch your back.
 
THE LAST NOVEL TO MAKE YOU LAUGH AND THE LAST TO MAKE YOU CRY…
 
Martin Short’s autobiography I Must Say was fantastic. Do the audiobook to get the full effect. In a way it had the funniest and some of the saddest parts of a book so you get both in one volume. 
 
WHAT YOU’RE READING NOW…
 
I just started Dodgers by Bill Beverly and it’s off to a great start. I’m looking forward to digging into the rest of it.
 
Thx for hanging out Eric—Always looking forward to your next novel offering…
 
Eric’s latest book, When The Devil Comes To Call, continues the adventures of aging hitman Lars and Shaine, the high spirited daughter of one of Lar’s targets who has more mayhem in one fist than most men in their entire bodies…
 
FOR MORE BOOKS BY ERIC BEETNER CLICK HERE
 

Thursday, July 21, 2016

GUIDES TO THE MEN'S ACTION ADVENTURE GENRE

(MACK BOLAN COVER ART BY DANIEL CROUSE)
 
GUIDES TO THE MEN'S ACTION ADVENTURE GENRE
 
I’ve written a number of columns recently highlighting men’s action adventure paperback original series deserving of wider exposure. In those columns, I’ve also mention some reference works and a few of the sites on the web where further information on these series can be found. For this column, I wanted to gather those sites together in one handy reference and add a number of others…
 
 
I have spent way too much time perusing the many books of my misspent youth on Joe Kenny’s info packed Glorious Trash blog. Trawling the depths of forgotten fiction, films, and beyond, Glorious Trash is filled with reviews and biting commentary on an outrageous number of paperback original men’s action/adventure series. This is a must hangout for faithful acolytes of the genre.
 
 
Another site dedicated to reviewing men's adventure, pulp heroes, horror paperbacks, disposable culture, transgressive literature, and theme parks. I’ll admit this is the only site to include reviews of theme parks, but the inclusion illustrates each of these sites gives a different perspective and adds additional information on the genre. 
 
 
Here you’ll find way too many desirable vintage men’s action/adventure paperbacks for sale. Spend too much time browsing and the irresistible offerings will steal cash out of your wallet like a thief in the night.
 
 
Celebrating the men’s adventure magazines of the ‘50s ‘60s and ‘70s, there is no other place on the web packed with so much information, original material, and wonderful cover scans of the men’s adventure magazines that dominated the magazine racks for three decades. Administrator Bob Dies has done a fantastic job preserving the history, cultural importance, and sheer over-the-top fearlessness of the men’s adventure magazines. Don’t go here unless you have several hours to spare. However, once you do visit, you’ll be drawn back again and again.
 
 
Kevin Burton Smith’s comprehensive Thrilling Detective website is the go to reference for almost any detective series or character ever to pull a gat, get hit over the head, or be a sucker for a dame. The listings are filled with inside info and provide full check lists of titles for every entry. 
 
 
An extensive listing of detailed information on almost 6,000 spy novels from 1,000 different series. Also includes expanded details on movies, television episodes, and a ton of other pertinent information. 
 
 
Subtitled, An Encyclopedia From Able Team To Z-Comm, Serial Vigilantes of Paperback Fiction is available in both physical and e-book version. Either way, it’s a wonderful experience to browse through the pages. This extensive reference is not perfect. The complete lack of related cover art is almost criminal and, beginning as it does in 1969 with Don Pendleton's The Executioner, there are some truly great series and characters missing from the listings. However, this is the first overview ever of the serial vigilante genre and it really is a terrific effort and required reading. The book examines the connections between serial vigilantes and the pulp heroes who preceded them and how the serial vigilante has influenced a variety of tough guys, private eyes, spies and cops in different media. A complete bibliography for each series is featured as well as background on the authors, including those behind the many pen names, pseudonyms, and publishing house names.
 
 
Novelizations and movie tie-ins from A(ce) to Z(ebra). Only the uninitiated would not recognize Ace and Zebra as two of the main publishers of men’s action adventure series and a flood of other pop culture related paperbacks from action adventure TV shows and movies…Pinnacle and other publishers of similar fare also get spotlighted on this ongoing blog with a deep archive of material.
 
 
Book reviews, movie reviews, interviews (Anne Francis, Pam Grier, and many more)…If it can be labeled shlock, you’ll find it covered here. Temple of Schlock also has an Endangered Species List looking at those precious gems of pop culture threatened with extinction by the passing of time.
 
 
Bruce Grossman’s column on the Bookgasm hasn’t been added to lately, but the archives of the column still hits all the high points and low points of men’s action/adventure series. Grossman is knowledgeable and has an abiding interest in the genre that shines through in his reviews.
 
 
Marty McKee defines his blog in no uncertain termstrashy movies, trashy paperbacks, trashy old TV shows, trashy...well, you get the picture. The description is not misleading. As in other sites mentioned in this column, Johnny Larue’s Crane Shot has extensive listings and reviews of all the stuff to satisfy a genre fan’s delight.
 
 
The Paperback Fanatic is the British magazine for collectors of pulp paperbacks from the 1960s and 1970s…Jam-packed with author interviews and articles about the weird and wonderful books from that era, The Paperback Fanatic is bursting with previously undocumented information and loaded with reproductions of many rarely seen covers.
 
 
A spin-off from the Paperback Fanatic, the three out of print Men Of Violence issues are extremely worth tracking down on the used market. Men Of Violence covers the lurid, often bloody, men's adventure paperbacks of the 1970s. Topics include intriguing aspects of the genre, such as a look at Manor Books—a New York-based operation that published some of the genre's sleaziest series, including Kill Squad, Bronson, Peter McCurtin's long running Marksman series, the western series Renegade starring Captain Gringo and more. Black-and-white cover reproductions are sprinkled across the pages giving a quick visual guide to what the genre is all about.
 
 
Each issue of Exploitation Retrospect is brimming with the kind of behind the scenes details that are catnip to genre fanatics. There are often articles on many of the men's action/adventure series, such as The Destroyer, Dirty Harry, and Ninja Master, as well as articles on Nikkatsu Erotic Cinema, Nazi Zombie Flicks, and a huge DVD review section of the best and worst in sci-fi, action, horror and sleazy trash sinema.
 
The above are the core sites and reference guides to the men’s action/adventure genre. There are certainly many others, which you can find by following the links on the sites above…

Tuesday, July 19, 2016

WRITERS ON BOOKS ~ DAVID FOSTER

WRITERS ON BOOKS ~ DAVID FOSTER
 
As part of an ongoing series of blog posts, I’ve asked my Aussie compatriot, thriller writer David Foster, to help me kick off a new blog post sequence examining what books writers are reading and what books have influenced their lives. 
 
As the pseudonymous Jack Tunney, David delivered three of the most exciting novels in the Fight Card series (King of the Outback, Rumble In the Jungle, The Iron Fists of Ned Kelly)—each perfect examples of the fine line between action and pulp Fight Card was designed to deliver. As James Hopwood, David has also taken it upon himself to put the fun back in espionage fiction with three top notch adventures (The Librio Defection, The Danakil Deception, The Ambrosia Kill) featuring neophyte British spy Jarvis Love—Agent of G.I.N. (Global Intelligence Network).
 
Cheers, David, for taking time to consider these questions about the books in your life…
 
My pleasure, Paul.
 
THE BOOK YOU LOVED AS A CHILD…
 
My dad passed on a whole stack of Biggles books to me as a youngster, and the one that continues to stick in my memory after all these years, is Biggles and the Cruise of the Condor. I know Biggles has dated, and may not be politically correct these days, but for firing a young boy's imagination back in the day, Biggles was an absolutely fantastic series.
 
Editor Note: Biggles is a fictional pilot and adventurer featured in almost a hundred novels written for boys by W. E. Johns between 1932 and 1968. Many of the volumes are collectors’ items today.
 
A BOOK YOU WOULD READ TO YOUR KIDS…
 
Easily, the Harry Potter series. No question. But, as a curveball here—and maybe not my best parenting moment—I remember back when my son was about ten years old, he came into my bedroom while I was re-reading Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas by Hunter S. Thompson. He jumped up on the bed beside me and we read it (or at least some of it) together, alternating reading page to page. That is to say, I would read a page—doing a poor Johnny Depp impersonation—and then he would read a page. I remember him laughing hysterically at the oddball descriptions of vampire bats etc. So, yeah, there's that!
 
THE BOOK THAT MADE YOU WANT TO BE A WRITER…
 
If you mean books that inspired me to become a writer, that's sort of difficult. Basically anything that jump-started my imagination—from Ian Fleming, Clive Cussler, or even Dan Brown (don't laugh—Dan tells a good tale). But if you want to know what pushed me to actually sit down and write, it’s actually two people rather than books. 
 
For years I toyed around writing little pieces here and there, never finishing anything. I had my blog, where I wrote short reviews of films and books, but that was nothing more than throw away stuff. Then two people entered my life. One of these people was Australian actor, Roger Ward. You may remember him from the original Mad Max, The Man From Hong Kong, Quigley Down Under and a whole host of Ozploitation Classics. Roger read a review I wrote for the movie, Stone, and commented upon it (correcting a few of my mistakes). Later when corresponding with Roger, I would sign my emails with Author of Permission to Kill, which was the name of my blog. Roger asked, what is this Permission to Kill? Is it a book? I had to admit it was just the name of my blog. But, I proudly spouted I had all these unfinished pieces I was  working on. Roger, in his usual direct manner said, and I paraphrase at best, Finish 'em off, Dave. They're not doin' anyone any bloody good sitting in your bottom drawer. It seems like such a simple comment, doesn't it? But it was one that really got me thinking about the difference between being a writer and pretending to be a writer. I had been a pretender.
 
Also at that time, a gentleman, who shall remain nameless for the moment, who also used to read my blog, published a novella. It was a simple little story about an LA cop, who was also an amateur fighter who gets caught up in a tangled web of vice and corruption. What I loved about this story was it was as thrilling and emotive as a full length novel, however it was short—maybe around 25,000 words, less than 100  pages. It taught me a good story didn't need to be a six hundred page behemoth. The book was also part of a series featuring different authors, so I thought, hey, I can do that!
 
So I asked the question, can I write an entry in the series? The answer was, yes. And that's where it all really began to come together. It forced me to finish something I started.
 
As some of you may have guessed, the writer was Paul Bishop and the book was Felony Fists…(sorry to piss in your pocket, Paul!)
 
YOUR FAVORITE CLASSIC…
 
The Three Musketeers.
 
THE CLASSIC YOU’VE NEVER BEEN ABLE TO READ…
 
The Big Nowhere. I have started it so many times, but just can't get into it.
 
THE CLASSIC YOU’VE PRETENDED TO HAVE READ…
 
The Lord of the Rings. Once again, one of those I have started on so many occasions, but just can't make the whole journey.
 
THE MOVIE ADAPTATION YOU’VE LOVED…
 
An obvious choice for me, On Her Majesty's Secret Service, because I think it improves on the book.
 
THE BOOK YOU’D LIKE TO SEE AS A MOVIE…
 
I like my movies loud and fast paced, with lots of gunfire and shit blowing up, so I'm going to say something like Matt Hilton's Joe Hunter series, starting at the beginning with Dead Man's Dust.
 
THE IMAGINARY PLACE WHERE YOU COULD LIVE…
 
Imaginary, eh? I don't read much fantasy, so that's tough. Maybe somewhere like a Bond villain's lair—however the lairs in the books aren't as swank as the ones in the films. Okay, how's this for obscure—the Caribbean volcano lair of Dominat, in the Mark Hood spy thriller, Black Napoleon (released in the US as Throne of Satan).
 
THE GENRE YOU’D READ IF YOU WERE LIMITED TO ONE…
 
Espionage
 
THE BOOK YOU’VE RETURNED TO AGAIN AND AGAIN…
 
Live and Let Die.
 
THE FICTIONAL FRIENDS YOU’D LOVE TO HAVE…
 
Dirk Pitt and Al Giordino. And Cliff Hardy.
 
THE LAST NOVEL TO MAKE YOU LAUGH AND THE LAST TO MAKE YOU CRY…
 
Maybe a slightly self-indulgent answer, because I have a story in the collection, but if you dive into the anthology Lee (stories about movie star, Lee Marvin) published by Crime Factory, you'll find a story by Johnny Shaw called The Big Red One. When I read it I was laughing so hard, I had tears streaming from my eyes – so that count's for both right?
 
WHAT YOU’RE READING NOW…
 
The Americanization of Sarah Gall by Jim Dow.
 
Thanks for your time, Paul. Great questions. I had a blast.
 
Back at you, my friend…Great answers…I’m heading right over to read The Big Red One
FOR MORE ON BOOKS BY DAVID FOSTER CLICK HERE