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Sunday, November 27, 2011

INTERVIEW: PAUL D. BRAZILL ~ 13 SHOTS OF NOIR!

INTERVIEW: PAUL D. BRAZILL ~ 13 SHOTS OF NOIR!

Spinetingler Award-nominee Paul D. Brazill was born in England and lives in Poland. Known for his dark fiction in the noir/horror series Drunk On The Moon and his short story collection Brit Grit, Brazill’s latest offering is 13 Shots Of Noir – sharp stories of booze, bullets, and bodies …

One of the founding members of The Hardboiled Collective, Paul has faced the bright lights and rubber hoses of interrogation on Bish’s Beat and confesses about his latest collection and what draws him to the dark side …

Thirteen Shots Of Noir has just hit the virtual bookshelves. What can you tell us about this excursion to the dark side?

13 Shots Of Noir is just that – 13 short, sharp stories of the darker side of life. Crime and horror stories that fall – if not stumble – somewhere between Roald Dahl and Frederic Brown.

How do you define noir and why does it fascinate you?

I think the best noir shines light on the darkness and, unless we’ve lived in a bubble, we’ve all gazed into the abyss at one time or other.

When you begin writing, do you purposely take the story in a noir direction or does the story take you there?

I always let the writing lead me rather than trying to lead the writing. I’m not a planner and I like to let my instinct take the driving seat.

Is there a difference between Brit noir and American noir?

I don’t think there is any near as much British noir as there is American and the American noir has a greater history to call upon. Which can maybe be a burden sometime. The British noir crawling out of the woodwork now has as much in common with the kitchen sink writers – and films – of the sixties as it does with Jim Thompson. Albert Finny is, I think, the poster boy for Brit Grit noir.

Is modern noir different than classic noir?

Well, I think something like something like James M Cain’s The Postman Always Rings Twice was breaking new ground in dirty realist fiction – as well as being a drama – but it is still a very modern novel.

I think the danger for modern noir is to be too aware of what’s gone before it and to seem to be tied its history’s umbilical cord. There are exceptions, of course. Dave Zeltserman’s Killer or Allan Guthrie’s Slammer – for example – are both very modern books, though, and will stand up as classics, I’m sure.

What is your favorite noir novel and film?

Patricia Highsmith’s This Sweet Sickness and The Grifters, just off the top of my head!

How has the e-book revolution changed the publishing paradigm for writers?

More! More! Faster! Faster!

What have been the most effective ways of marketing your e-books?

I’ve no idea, really, what works and what doesn’t, for a little fish like me.

Have your personal reading habits changed to e-books?

Well, I read on my laptop, so short stories and novella’s are the best ebooks for that format. We’ll see what happens if and when I buy a Kindle.

What is next on your writing horizon?

I’m putting together a short story collection featuring the darkly comic adventures of a PI that I created called Peter Ord. Think Albert Finny in Gumshoe meets Tom Ripley! And I have started a Peter Ord novella, too which is tentatively titled The Hit Man And Her.

Thanks to Paul Brazill for cracking under the pressure of intense interrogation as Bish’s Beat returns to rattling the proverbial doorknobs while twirling the proverbial nightstick.

Be sure to check out 13 Shots Of Noir for a dark time in the old town tonight …

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